What Types of Geothermal Systems Are Available In Maryville, IL?

GEOTHERMAL HEATING & COOLING: EXPLAINED

When it comes to heating and cooling, people always want to know how they can increase their efficiency to cut down on costs. However, small things may not always affect your efficiency as drastically as you want. Many people that are truly looking to improve efficiency look to geothermal systems to harness the power of the Earth’s energy. However, what is geothermal energy? How do you get it, and does it actually improve your energy efficiency? Read on for more details about geothermal systems that how they may benefit you!

HOW DOES IT WORK?

When we think of heating and cooling systems, usually, we’re thinking of a central air conditioner or furnace unit – these are the two most common types of systems. With traditional heating and cooling systems, air is used as the primary medium through which homes are cooled. Geothermal systems use soil or water to transfer hot and cold air. The secret is under your feet. While the temperature above ground fluctuates drastically depending on the seasons, the temperature below ground is constant, meaning you save on the energy needed to heat and cool your home.

Geothermal systems use coils, buried beneath the ground, to absorb and transfer heat that from the surrounding soil. Then, an electric heat pump acts as your furnace and your air conditioner to deliver hot and cold air throughout the home. Read on for more details about each type of system.

VERTICAL LOOP SYSTEM

This type of systems consists of loops buried vertically in the ground. First, holes are dug to the correct depth (between 100 & 400 ft.), and coils are inserted into them and connected at the bottom.

HORIZONTAL LOOP SYSTEM

Horizontal systems use the same principle, with coils laid in wide trenches dug in the yard. The trenches are usually at least 6 ft. Wide. These systems need a lot of room for installation.

POND/LAKE SYSTEM

This system is unique in that the coils are buried in water. Homes must have legal access to a pond or lake to make this system work. Mounted on racks in the water, coils submerge at least 10 feet deep.

Ready to switch to geothermal? Contact Morrison for the knowledge you need to get started!

Categories: